Special Presenters

Presenters Topics
Jennifer Abrams Communication for Leaders
Jonathan Borden Working with East Asian Students and Families
Jenny Chiang Admissions, Advancement and Development
Kim Cofino Technology
Marc Frankel Leadership
Mary Ann Haley-Speca Coaching & Supervising Teaching
Eeqbal Hassim Intercultural Education
Sir John Jones Creative, Imaginative, and Happy Organizations
Lance King Courage, Resilience and Failing Well
Mike Kuczala Group Development/Leadership
Laura Lipton Group Development/Leadership
Rami Madani Curriculum Leadership
Mina Merkel Board and School Leadership Professional Development/Governance/Strategic Planning
Ruby Payne Understanding socio economic issues
Richard Pearce Culture/Identity/Values
Cary Reid Engaging with our Intellectual Reality
Mike Rodman Risk Management
Jennifer Sparrow
Deb Welch Leadership and Learning
Andy Whitney Leading Early Childhood Education
Kendall Zoller Communication and Leadership

 

Special Presenters


Jennifer Abrams

Biography: Jennifer Abrams, a former English teacher and new teacher coach, is currently a communications consultant who works with educators and others on new employee support, being generationally savvy, effective collaboration skills, having hard conversations and creating identity safe workplaces. Jennifer’s publications include Having Hard Conversations, The Multigenerational Workplace: Communicate, Collaborate & Create Community and Hard Conversations Unpacked - the Whos, Whens and What Ifs. Jennifer is featured in ASCD’s video series, “Master Class,” and in the Ontario (Canada) Ministry of Education’s “Leadership Matters: Supporting Open-to-Learning Conversations” video series. She was one of the “18 Women All K-12 Educators Should Know” featured in the blog ‘Finding Common Ground’’ from Education Week. Jennifer’s monthly newsletter, Voice Lessons, is at www.jenniferabrams.com and she can be found on Twitter @jenniferabrams.



Workshop 1
Title: Influence and Persuasion - Key Leadership Skills
Description: Gone are the days when a leader's positional power was sufficient to advance an agenda. Today's successful leaders must gain commitment to ambitious goals not only from people who work for them, but also from peers and a diverse group of stakeholders who are beyond their command. See how the ability to influence and persuade others is now a critical differentiator of leaders who move people to support their goals from those who can't. Participants will: Learn to recognize influencing behaviors in themselves and others. Learn language skills that influential people use effectively on a daily basis. Learn more about resistance and the triggers that threaten people and how to help people move past those triggers. Have time to work on personal case studies and learn specific strategies to increase your influence in your own organization.

Workshop 2
Title: Being Generationally Savvy: Communicating Effectively Across Generations
Description: Have you noticed your newer teachers feel and look and act differently than novice colleagues you remember? Are you hearing of communication challenges between colleagues of different ages? Are you becoming aware more employees want a life-work balance vs. a work-life balance? Generational factors might be coming into play. Who are these four generations in our workplaces? What are their strengths and needs? What structures and communication protocols should we design to work well with them all? And, what knowledge do we need to help every group thrive? Using Jennifer’s book, The Multigenerational Workplace: Communicate, Collaborate and Create Community, this workshop will provide tools, resources on this increasingly intriguing topic. Participants will learn how to Formulate a better understanding of each generation’s motivations and needs in the workplace Learn tools that will translate into better more effective collaboration for generationally diverse teams

Workshop 3
Title: Hard Conversations Unpacked-Extending the Learning
Description: Hard Conversations Unpacked is a workshop that focuses on becoming more comfortable with the energy of conflict. The workshop revisits the key elements of Abrams' book, Having Hard Conversations, such as the outcome mapping and scripting protocol, and goes deeper to provide additional strategies for being more confident and compassionate when faced with situations involving conflict. Participants will learn how to Keep conflict at a cognitive level that is more psychologically safe Look at a hard conversation through a variety of lenses including culture, generation and gender Respond productively when conflict escalates both in one-on -one and in group situations

Workshop 4
Title: tba
Description: tba tba

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Jonathan Borden

Biography: Dr. Jonathan Borden has lived and worked in East Asia since 1976, with nearly three decades at Seoul Foreign School and the past eleven years at Shanghai American School spent as a teacher and administrator. Dr. Borden is the author of Confucius Meets Piaget: An Educational Perspective on Ethnic Korean Children and their Parents, and has been a workshop presenter at international schools and conferences on the topic of how our western style international schools can best understand and serve our students and parents from East Asian Confucian cultures. Although his focus is on Korean students and the challenges they face in our schools, his Shanghai experience has provided insight into the differences and similarities between the Chinese and Korean educational cultures. Dr. Borden and his Korean-born wife, Soon-ok, raised two sons at Seoul Foreign School and know the challenges of parenting third culture children. Dr. Borden holds a Ph.D. from Walden University, at which he first began to study and write about cultural issues, particularly as they relate to Asian young people and education.



Workshop 1
Title: Working with Korean and Chinese Students: Theory into Practice
Description: Building on the Pre-conference materials, we'll take a look at East Asian teaching and learning styles, the role of the student and teacher, writing styles, respect and bullying, body language, different kinds of families, working with parents, child-rearing, family discipline, dating and relationships, and traditional values in the digital age. Workshop participants will engage in building upon theory to see how and why East Asian students and families share some of the characteristics they do - and how and why they are different. Differences between various types of ethnic Chinese, and Koreans will be discussed within the educational context.

Workshop 2
Title: Keeping our Asian Students Emotionally Safe: Straddling Two (or more) Cultures
Description: This workshop will take a look at the process and challenges that face Korean and Chinese students as they find themselves often caught between the cultural expectations of their Asian parents and the more western demands and philosophies of our schools. How do they effectively straddle two or even three cultures, all pulling in different directions and sending them dramatically different messages? This challenge is heightened when they become "hidden immigrants and return to their home countries, often to attend universities. The college entrance and selection process, issues of hierarchy and respect, hazing, life as a college student, social norms, family dynamics, Asian family expectations, dating, and military service will be explored. Participants are welcome to bring and share stories of their own alumni.

Workshop 3
Title: Sharing the Story: Making Sense of our Teaching Stories with Asian Students
Description: Participants should bring and be willing to share their own specific academic or behavioral issues to the table for discussion, sharing insights, applying theory to practice, and taking home potential strategies to address real challenges in their schools related to working with East Asian students and their families. This wrap up session of this series of workshops by Dr Jonathan Borden provides time for participants to hear from others about what works, what doesn't, and how to achieve real collaboration and success with East Asian families.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Jenny Chiang

Biography: Jenny Chiang is an administrator with three decades of experience in admissions, college counseling, and fundraising. Chiang served as Assistant Head for Advancement at National Cathedral School and in fundraising roles at Potomac School and Dana Hall School. Chiang began her career as account executive at Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising. She next joined the U of Pennsylvania as Director of Admissions, W. Region before serving as Admissions/College Counselor at Brentwood School and Shipley School followed by Director of Diversity at Baldwin School. She has served on the Board at Barnesville School and on Strategic Plan, Enrollment, and Campaign Committees at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. She has contributed to NAIS, Natick (MA) Public School Council, CASE, AFP, and Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Chiang earned B.A., B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees from U of Pennsylvania. Her artwork showed in 60 exhibitions (Smithsonian Corcoran Gallery and USA Today). She is fluent in Mandarin.



Workshop 1
Title: Understanding volunteers (and ultimately donors)
Description: Let’s ponder our best volunteers and how we can meaningfully engage them for the school. We’ll examine the characteristics of positive partnerships between volunteers and staff. What do volunteers want from volunteering and what do they expect from staff? At the same time, we’ll discuss what staff need from volunteers, how to better understand and motivate them, and how to manage their expectations. Finally, we’ll examine volunteer trends.

Workshop 2
Title: Overview of an Alumni Relations program
Description: Let’s examine an Alumni Relations program. The program starts with strategic plan alignment to help develop program goals, priorities and timeline. With the strategic plan and program goals to guide the program development, different outreach programs and communication are created. To evaluate the effectiveness of the program, we’ll review outcomes. Fundraising trends that impact Alumni Relations programming and giving will guide future programming.

Workshop 3
Title: Strategies for building an advancement office with top advancement professionals
Description: With personnel as the most valued asset to our schools, let’s be sure that we identify the top people and engage the best performers. We’ll spend this session answering some of these questions: What are some common characteristics of talented fundraisers? What Myers-Briggs personality type is best suited for fundraising? How do we recruit and retain talented staff?

Workshop 4
Title: Practice the basics of the fundraising cycle: identify, cultivate, ask, steward
Description: We’ll review the Who, What, When, Where and How to ask for a gift. Launching an advancement program with constituent relations program, annual giving campaign, major gift program, and stewardship.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Kim Cofino

Biography: Kim Cofino is an experienced, dynamic and innovative educator. Her international teaching has taken her to Germany, Malaysia, Thailand (ISB), Japan, and now back to Bangkok (NIST International School). Her job titles have included: Academic IT Coordinator, Technology Learning Facilitator, 21st Century Literacy Specialist, Technology and Learning Coach, consultant, and most recently she has added, Consultant-in-Residence at NIST International School. Kim is a COETAIL co-founder, a founding partner in Eduro Learning, and a member of the Advisory and Board for the Learning 2.0 Global Conference. She regularly consults with US public and international schools and her work has been widely published in educational websites, journals and books. Please find out more about Kim at kimcofino.com

DOWNLOAD HANDOUTS



Workshop 1
Title: The Difference Between Ordinary & Extraordinary: Telling (and Owning) Your School’s Story
Description: We’re all proud of our schools, our students, and our community. Our students are engaged in outstanding learning experiences on a daily basis, but these are rarely documented or shared outside the individual classroom in a purposeful way. How can we, as school leaders, highlight the amazing work of both our students and our teachers in spaces that connect within and beyond our immediate school community? Why should we share? What should we share? Where should we share? What tools should we use? We all know that if you’re not telling the story of your school, someone else is! Ordinary schools leave it up to someone else to tell their story, extraordinary schools plan, coordinate and purposefully share their story with intention and focus. Leave today’s workshop with an understanding of why sharing your story is so critical, how to harness the multitude of tools you can use to share your story, and an action plan for taking your school’s story from ordinary to extraordinary!

Workshop 2
Title: Cultivating Community: Helping Parents Understand the Power of Technology for Learning
Description: In our technology-rich schools, we are often focused on ensuring that we have the right tools so that teachers and students can use technology effectively in the classroom. We spend plenty of professional development time and funds on training teachers to transform learning for their students. On top of all that, in many of our schools, we employ coaches to help teachers continue to develop their skills with technology. However, many schools still struggle to help parents understand why students (and teachers) are spending so much time with technology. Developing a parent education program, specifically around technology and learning, can help build a sense of community within the school, support teachers and schools in their efforts to transform learning, and create a network of positive and engaged parents who will advocate for the school’s technology goals. This session will highlight key elements of parent education programs developed and facilitated over the past 8 years.

Workshop 3
Title: Bang for Your Buck: Getting the Most out of Your Technology Coach(es)
Description: In our technology-rich schools, we know that changing classroom practice doesn’t end with the distribution of hardware and software. Building and sustaining current teaching and learning practices requires strong pedagogical support. Many schools have hired technology coaches (sometimes called facilitators or coordinators) to fulfil this role because they understand that it is the partnership between the teacher and coach that brings out the full potential of any laptop program. However, not all coaching teams are created equally, and we can easily see that coaching is more effective in some schools than others. Is it all a matter of personality? Or skill set? Or expectations? This session will highlight key elements of a successful technology coaching program including what to expect from your coaches, as well as strategies and suggestions for hiring, building and sustaining a successful coaching team, based on experiences at International School Bangkok, Yokohama International School and NIST International School.

Workshop 4
Title: Looking for Learning in a Digital Classroom
Description: Our teachers and students have access to a wide variety of devices - everything from one laptop per student, to sets of iPads or tablets for each classroom. But how do we know that those devices are being used to transform learning, and not just replicate what’s always been done, now in digital form? Or even worse, when the technology is used just for the sake of using technology, with no true purpose at all? What should we be looking for when observing teachers and students in action? How can we tell that student learning is deeper, more authentic, or more relevant to today’s world when they’re using digital tools? How do we know that student learning is reaching the transforman level of the SAMR framework when we have only a few minutes in each classroom?

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Marc Frankel

Biography: Dr. Marc Frankel, Ph. D. is a Senior Consultant and Partner in Triangle Associates, an international consultancy specializing in higher, independent and international education. A psychologist by training, Dr. Frankel facilitates governance workshops, leadership development programs, and strategic planning in the United States and around the world, and coaches numerous senior leaders in universities and independent schools. His clients include schools in Europe, Asia and North America, along with many of the regional and national associations of schools. Dr. Frankel is a frequent presenter at EARCOS conferences, and consults to numerous schools in the region. In addition to being an experienced consultant, Dr. Frankel has more than 15 years of experience serving on private, independent school boards. He is in his 10th year as a trustee at Wildwood School in Los Angeles.



Workshop 1
Title: Making the Match Work: From Head Search to Beyond the Honeymoon
Description: Boards search for heads and candidates searching for leadership positions are two sides of a romance. As with any two individuals, the search romance is prone to delusion, fear, denial and fantasy. This workshop will have two parts, with the first focusing on how boards and candidates can keep a rational mindset during the search. The second part will be about getting beyond the honeymoon to making the marriage work. Board members and head of school candidates alike will take away immediately useful tools to enhance their chances of making a successful match.

Workshop 2
Title: Letting Data Drive Your Strategy
Description: This workshop will walk participants through a methodology for using data - both qualitative and quantitative - as a basis for developing and revising strategic plans. Our approach guides governors and administrators to focus on what matters most for creating enduring school success. Our aim is to bring an element of rigor to the strategy-making exercise, while still allowing space for schools to innovate. Attendees will take away a model they can use to strengthen how their school approaches strategic planning.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Mary Ann Haley-Speca

Biography: Mary Ann Haley-Speca is a senior consultant with Research for Better Teaching, Inc. Mary Ann is an international consultant whose focus is on the study of instructional practice and creating professional cultures of non-defensive examination of practice and continuous growth. Mary Ann offers graduate level courses, seminars, and consulting to school and district level leaders, instructional coaches, and classroom teachers. She is co-author of several publications including The Skillful Teacher: Building your Teaching Skills.



Workshop 1
Title: Coaching for Learner Centered Engagement and Discourse
Description: Learning takes place when the teacher stops talking. How do we coach teachers to insure that all students are engaged, participating in classroom discourse and doing most of the talking in order to insure understanding of what is being taught? In these sessions we will explore the requisite classroom conditions, elements of lesson design, and a repertoire of concrete moves and prompts teachers can use to create such a learning environment.

Workshop 2
Title: Analyzing Teaching and Communicating with Substance About What We See
Description: How can we engage teachers in conversations about instructional practice that lead to growth, insight and learning? In these concurrent sessions we will explore a framework for analyzing the many facets of everyday teaching and developing shared language for talking about instructional practice. We will also practice a structure that organizes our analysis of what we see, focuses our conversations, invites teacher reflection, and provides concrete, specific and substantive feedback that teachers can hear, interpret and use to grow in their practice.

Workshop 3
Title: tba
Description: tba

Workshop 4
Title: tba
Description: tba

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Eeqbal Hassim

Biography: Dr Eeqbal Hassim is Associate Director, Partnerships and Development, at the Asia Education Foundation, based at Asialink, The University of Melbourne. He is also Senior Fellow (Honorary) at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, The University of Melbourne. Eeqbal's area of expertise is teaching and learning for intercultural understanding. He has worked with many schools in Australia and internationally, and has been an Intercultural Advisor with the Council of International Schools.



Workshop 1
Title: From multicultural to intercultural
Description: This workshop explores a more transformative approach to intercultural education, beyond learning about cultures to promote tolerance. Cultures are rarely discrete in a transnationalised world. Because cultural exchanges are occurring more rapidly and more dynamically than ever, cultures need to learn from and with one another in the spirit of serious engagement and dialogue. Intercultural education is about changing how people think and act with respect to cultural diversity, as well as intercultural engagement and its implications. It requires not just knowledge about cultures, but a combination of cognitive, affective and behavioural dimensions. Participants explore aspects of intercultural curriculum and pedagogy, as well as some enablers and inhibitors of good intercultural learning.

Workshop 2
Title: The Transcultural School
Description: This workshop builds on the premise that intercultural learning needs to recognise and build on the notion of the transcultural school as a given. In transcultural contexts, cultural hybrids interact to produce further hybridity. This hybridity involves students and their families, teachers, the curriculum, pedagogy, teaching and learning resources, knowledge itself, etc. This workshop will enable participants to: recognise their schools as transcultural; understand how transculturalism applies to various aspects of the school; and how to use the notion of the transcultural school to support deep and transformative learning focused on cultural connectivity, its challenges, opportunities, and consequences.

Workshop 3
Title: Global citizenship education and intercultural competence
Description: Global citizenship education is a responsibility of schools, as our futures become increasingly co-created and shared. Creative and collaborative solutions to complex issues that exist, and are yet to exist, must guide education today and into the future. Core to developing global citizenship is intercultural competence, which seeks to enable students to adapt to cultural perspectives and complexities, to transform the way they think about and engage with diverse peoples. Participants explore ways to make global citizenship a reality through the development of intercultural competence.

Workshop 4
Title: tba
Description: tba

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Sir John Jones

Biography: Sir John is one of a small, select band of educational professionals who have not only had their achievements recognised in the New Year’s Honours List (2003), but have been able to help and inspire others with their knowledge and passion. One of the most entertaining, inspiring and sought-­‐after speakers on the global educational stage, his achievements and reputation for straight-­‐talking, leadership and creativity have led him to be invited on to a number of panels and think-­‐ tanks. When Headteacher of three secondary schools over a period of 17 years, he was asked to join the Government’s Policy Action Team for Neighbourhood Renewal at the Social Exclusion Unit. He was also a member of the Headteachers’ National Focus Group on Truancy and Exclusion and the Excellence in Cities Project at the DfES. Sir John was part of the National Remodelling Team and the Leadership and Development Unit sponsored by the National College for School Leadership. Working part-­‐time at the Centre f



Workshop 1
Title: tba
Description: tba

Workshop 2
Title: tba
Description:

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Lance King

Biography: Lance King (B. Tech, Dip. Ed(dist), M.Ed(hons)) is an internationally recognized author, teacher and workshop facilitator who, in the last 20 years, has worked with over 160,000 students worldwide as well as many thousands of their teachers and parents. He is the creator of the Art of Learning programme taught in over 200 schools in 22 countries and is a specialist in the direct teaching of ‘learning skills’. Within the International Baccalaureate Organisation he has been instrumental in the development of the Approaches to Learning (ATL) curriculum for both the new MYP and the Diploma programmes, he is the co-author of two ATL Skills textbooks and since 2013 has delivered many workshops in IB schools on the design and implementation of successful ATL programmes. He is married with four grown-up children, lives in Raglan, New Zealand and divides his time between teaching and presenting workshops for teachers, parents and students around the world and writing.



Workshop 1
Title: Designing a School-Wide '21st Century Learning Skills' programme
Description: - What are the structural features of a 21st C learning skills programme? - What programmes are successfully in place around the world? - What are the key Cognitive, Affective and Meta-cognitive 21st C skills? - Are there differences between Core Generic and Subject Specific 21st C skills? - How do 21st C skills teaching and assessment practices differ from those for subject matter - What are the steps of development of the 21st C skills across a student’s school life? - How can you map out 21st C skills both horizontally and vertically?

Workshop 2
Title: Courage, Resilience and Failing Well
Description: - What is the significance of failure and a student’s reaction to it? - How can students (and teachers) learn how to fail well? - What is the role of attribution of causality in success, failure and subsequent motivation? - How can teachers model flexible mindsets and develop the process focused classroom? - How do Locus of Control and Learned Helplessness ideas contribute to the nature of resilience? - How can students learn to be more resilient? - How can a school develop a resilience focused culture?

Workshop 3
Title: Designing Inquiry-based lessons to practise 21st Century skills and develop Self-Regulation
Description: - What are the structural approaches and lesson design strategies for improving students’ understanding and transfer of knowledge and skills? - How can inquiry questions be used to develop dialogue and higher order thinking - How can learning experiences be designed to use 21st C skills, achieve subject objectives and promote the development of self-regulated learning?

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Mike Kuczala

Biography: Mike Kuczala is the coauthor of the Corwin bestseller 'The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning through Movement' and an internationally known speaker who gave the opening keynote at the 2016 EARCOS Teachers' Conference. President of Kuczala Consulting and the Academic Director for the Regional Training Center, his standing room only presentations have been experienced in such diverse settings as The American Society for Training and Development, The Forum for Innovative Leadership, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the American Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Lawyer Brain OD Round Table. Mike's professional development programs in the areas of brain-based instruction, the kinesthetic classroom, and motivation have been enjoyed by tens of thousands of teachers and administrators around the world.



Workshop 1
Title: Creating a Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning through Movement
Description: In this highly interactive session participants will discover a six-level framework for using physical activity and movement thoughtfully and purposefully at all grade levels and in all content areas. The framework includes (1)preparing the brain,(2)providing brain breaks,(3)supporting exercise and fitness,(4)creating class cohesion,(5)reviewing content, and (6)teaching content. The prominence and importance of the brain/body connection will also be discussed and experienced. With a robust body of research that supports using movement in all classrooms as a critical tool of engagement, how to encourage teachers to create a kinesthetic classroom will be highlighted.

Workshop 2
Title: Brain Principles and Brain Breaks
Description: Learn why committing to physical activity is critical from the brain's perspective! There are 6 key brain principles that support using movement in all learning situations. Discover how concepts based around novelty, emotion, meaning, social interaction, concrete experience and more dictate that educators get their students up and moving. Furthermore, the question of "Why does movement enhance the learning process?" will be answered through topics such as implicit learning and academic success, state management, episodic memory, differentiating instruction, motivation and more. This session will also provide plenty of movement as participants will experience different brain breaks that are immediately usable in the classroom or group meeting situation.

Workshop 3
Title: Movement, Physical Activity and Professional Development: What a Classroom Teacher Needs to Know
Description: The possibility for change and evolution in the classroom has never been greater. Technology brought a first wave of significant change; now movement, physical activity and new types of equipment that allow for more and different ways to move in a classroom setting are growing in popularity because of their effectiveness. For teachers to understand the broad scope of what it means to use movement thoughtfully and purposefully they need to be aware of the 6-part framework, ways to implement the framework, the resources available to support the framework, and also be exposed to the types of equipment that are available for classroom use such as standing desks, pedal desks, strider desks, ellipse desks, balance desks and more.

Workshop 4
Title: Creating a Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning through Movement
Description: In this highly interactive session participants will discover a six-level framework for using physical activity and movement thoughtfully and purposefully at all grade levels and in all content areas. The framework includes (1)preparing the brain,(2)providing brain breaks,(3)supporting exercise and fitness,(4)creating class cohesion,(5)reviewing content, and (6)teaching content. The prominence and importance of the brain/body connection will also be discussed and experienced. With a robust body of research that supports using movement in all classrooms as a critical tool of engagement, how to encourage teachers to create a kinesthetic classroom will be highlighted.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Laura Lipton

Biography: Laura is an international consultant whose writing, research and seminars focus on effective and innovative instructional practices and on building professional and organizational capacities for enhanced learning. Laura engages with educational agencies designing and conducting workshops on learning-focused supervision, developing learning communities, data-driven dialogue and strategies for building professional expertise for teachers and administrators. Laura is author and co-author of numerous publications related to organizational and professional development, learning-focused schools and data-based practice. Her most recent publications include Learning-focused Supervision: Developing Professional Expertise in Data-driven Systems and Data-driven Dialogue: A Leadership Guide for Facilitating Collaborative Inquiry.



Workshop 1
Co-Presenter/s: n/a
Title: Leading Groups: Effective Strategies for Building Professional Community
Description: Leaders need versatility and flexibility as they bring project responsibility, technical knowledge and information to their groups. Knowing how to structure effective processes, relevant content and authentic collaboration produces work sessions that balance participation and use time efficiently to complete complex tasks. Skillful leaders are able to orchestrate task focus, develop process skills and foster collaborative relationships for their groups. Topics include: designing productive meetings and work sessions, energizing groups, supporting information processing and facilitating challenging conversations.

Workshop 2
Title: Leading Groups: Effective Strategies for Building Professional Community
Description: workshop 1 continued Leaders need versatility and flexibility as they bring project responsibility, technical knowledge and information to their groups. Knowing how to structure effective processes, relevant content and authentic collaboration produces work sessions that balance participation and use time efficiently to complete complex tasks. Skillful leaders are able to orchestrate task focus, develop process skills and foster collaborative relationships for their groups. Topics include: designing productive meetings and work sessions, energizing groups, supporting information processing and facilitating challenging conversations.

Workshop 3
Title: Learning-focused Conversations: Consulting, Collaborating and Coaching for Professional Excellence
Description: This session explores the what, why and how of learning-focused relationships between professional colleagues. These sessions offer practical tools, specific templates, and technical tips for educators whose role is to develop and expand instructional and content expertise in others. We will focus on the tools necessary to be growth agents not change agents, and introduce a Continuum of Interaction from consulting (sharing expertise and providing technical assistance), to collaboration (shared planning and problem solving), to coaching (a non-judgmental interaction which promotes reflection and develops professional capacity) for navigating conversations conversations that engage practitioners of all experience levels with thoughtful instructional planning, reflecting and problem solving. Learn to use time-effective structures in one-to-one and small group interactions that focus conversations, maintain momentum and develop targeted thinking skills.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Rami Madani

Biography: Rami Madani is the Director of Curriculum and Professional Development at the International School of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Prior to that he worked in international schools in Yemen, Zambia, and India, serving students and faculty at all school levels. He has taught subjects ranging from Mathematics to Music to Theory of Knowledge. He served as a secondary school principal, dean of students, and department head in various international schools. Rami has designed a variety of professional development and training programs for teachers. In addition, he is an IB Diploma consultant and is passionate about aligning a school's systems with its mission, and ensuring that teaching and learning is the focus of what schools do.



Workshop 1
Title: Innovative, Differentiated and Sustainable Orientation Program for New Teachers
Description: How do we ensure that the mission, vision, values and practices of our schools are sustained and advanced as faculty and staff turnover? How do we provide an orientation program that is differentiated, self-managed, and encourages teachers to be self-directed learners? Taking advantage of differentiated access to online learning, flexible learning time, clearly defined expectations, and an approach that provides accountability are essential to ensure that new and returning faculty have the same set of knowledge and skills. This session will present a data driven approach that balances an effective use of technology and social interaction to address orientation program needs as they align with the school’s on-going PD.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Mina Merkel

Biography: Mina Merkel experience spans 45+ countries designing and customizing curriculum for her clients. Her expertise includes executive coaching, change management, organizational development, training and mentoring programs that increased leadership’s effectiveness, lean processing, engaging and empowering leaders and students. Currently, among other projects, Mina designed and is facilitating a Coaching Practice Course for Qatar Petroleum engineers and leaders through Qatar University. Mina taught a postgraduate university level course in Change Management at Temple University in Tokyo, Japan. Mina is customizing workshops and retreats for boards of directors throughout the world and Leadership Groups for multiple education and corporate clients.



Workshop 1
Title: Collaborative Facilitation
Description: Want to learn how to improve meeting or class facilitation and interject with dynamic collaboration? This session includes the latest techniques on how to foster collaboration and facilitate to all learning styles using Honey and Mumford’s model (Activist, Theorist, Pragmatist, and Reflector). It will introduce and/or remind participants of the many influences and cultural norms that are at play in the boardroom and/or classroom. How situational leadership plays into the outcomes you are attempting to reach. This session is intended for all board members, administrators, and teachers.

Workshop 2
Title: Conflict Resolution for Boards and Administration
Description: Have you ever wondered what appropriate behavior in a boardroom looks like? What shared beliefs do you have regarding what is appropriate behavior? How board members and administration treat one another is key success factors for all schools. What is in bounds and what is out of bounds as it relates to board meetings? Is there a way to minimize and possibly eliminate conflict? Come to this session recommended for Boards and Administration to learn structure to deal with conflict when it arises.

Workshop 3
Title: Strategic Planning: Key Stakeholders collaboration in Board Strategic Planning Process
Description: Learn the process of strength finding with the key constituencies of a school to feed into a board’s strategic planning process. Students, parents, teachers, staff and board members all play a very important role in identifying what makes your school great today and what would we like to see in your future. Most, if not all, accreditation organizations recommend and/or require involvement of these very important stakeholders. Come learn how to facilitate broad constituent focus group brainstorming sessions that will positively impact the strategic planning process learning strategies on how to navigate the turbulent waters so sessions don’t sink into the ‘venting’ abyss. Intended for Board members and school leadership current and future!

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Ruby Payne

Biography: Ruby K. Payne, PhD, is founder of aha! Process, an author, speaker, publisher, and career educator. She is an expert on the mindsets of economic class and on crossing socioeconomic lines in education and work. Recognized for her foundational book, A Framework for Understanding Poverty, now in its 5th edition. it has sold more than 1,500,000 copies, and won the REVERE Golden Lamp Award for Professional Development in 2014. Dr. Payne has helped individuals of all economic backgrounds achieve academic, professional, and personal success. Dr. Payne has collaborated on more than a dozen related books, including Bridges Out of Poverty co-authored with Philip E. DeVol and Terie Dreussi-Smith, which offers strategies for building sustainable communities. She has presented her work throughout North America, and in Europe, Australia, China, and India. Her publishing company has received numerous awards. Payne graduated from Goshen College, in Indiana, earned a master’s in Literature from Western Michigan University; and a doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy from Loyola University, Chicago.



Workshop 1
Co-Presenter/s: none
Title: Hidden Rules in Wealth and Poverty
Description: This session will focus on the hidden rules in wealth and poverty that students and parents often bring to the institution. Strategies will be given to address the issues.

Workshop 2
Title: Strategies to improve academic performance
Description: This session will focus on the tools that improve academic achievement: mental models, planning tools, conceptual frames, expert rubrics, etc. The role of abstract representational systems in learning will be examined.

Workshop 3
Title: Strategies for better behavior and relaitonships
Description: This session will address several ways to improve behavior and relationships with students and parents. These tools include voices, staying out of the triangle, and reframing. Specific strategies for males will also be discussed.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Richard Pearce

Biography: Dr Richard Pearce comes from a diasporic Cornish family in the UK and has worked in International Schools for 40 years, teaching IB Biology for 35 years. He was a founder-member of the European Council for International Schools Cross-Culture Committee. His consultancy on cross-cultural issues is reinforced by doctoral research through the University of Bath, tracing the adjustment of new students in International Schools. In the last 20 years he has written chapters and articles in a range of publications, including co-authoring ‘The Essential Guide for Teachers in International Schools’. He has contributed to teacher-training in 18 countries with presentations on identity and culture, including Bachelors, Masters and doctoral courses at the University of Bath, London Metropolitan University, Oxford Brookes University, and Fontys Hogeschool, Sittard, Netherlands. He recently edited ‘International Education and Schools: moving beyond the first 40 years’, published by Bloomsbury.



Workshop 1
Title: Dealing with Culture: why one size diesn't fit all
Description: When people from different places disagree, culture is commonly blamed. But culture is not just an irritating detail, it is the system by which we learn how to live our lives. This is being revealed by recent research in a number of separate academic fields. A modern model of what culture is and how it works leads to a simple common-sense procedure for approaching cultural conflicts in International Schools.

Workshop 2
Title: What is Identity?
Description: There is a tension between promoting a firm, stable identity and encouraging creative, open-minded originality in the child who is growing up in a mobile life-style. Values such as grit and character are regaining prominence in mission statements, yet flexibility and inventiveness are praised as necessities for the new technological era. In dealing with these questions the word ‘identity’ is often invoked. Resolving this conundrum calls for a clearer idea of what identity is, how it operates, and how it is acquired.

Workshop 3
Title: Universal values; the case for and against.
Description: Before international schools commit to any given value-system, they need to have a collective view of the institutional values they share, and the attitude they take when values conflict among clients, community and context. The standard Western check-lists such as the IB Learner Profile and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights may not come naturally to their current community. Ways of standing back and seeing values in a wider context will be presented.

Workshop 4
Title: ‘International-mindedness’: creative connection or empty signifier?
Description: International-mindedness has become a central issue of International Education principle and practice, and in accreditation evaluations we are often invited to define it for each institution. This is cultural plurality in action, a welcome recognition of the variety that exists in our professional area. Yet it leaves schools with the unaccustomed task of defining their own product within the generic field by a process involving the whole community. The possible meanings of the term will be considered, some core procedures will be reviewed, and colleagues are invited to share their own experiences.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Cary Reid

Biography: Cary Reid is the Coordinator for the UWC Mahindra Project Based Diploma at UWC Mahindra College. He leads the team responsible for developing and implementing the program - a brave approach to redesigning education for the 21st century, built on the principles of project based learning, experiential education and outdoor learning. He believes that educators must support the learning that happens both in and out of the classroom. He can be contacted at creid@muwci.net or PBD@muwci.net or via www.uwcmahindracollege.org/uwc-learning/academics/project-based-diploma



Workshop 1
Title: The UWC Mahindra College Project Based Diploma – redesigning high school
Description: UWC Mahindra College has been a pioneer in education and the UWC Mahindra Project Based Diploma is our most recent innovation in experiential learning. The program is designed to support students through a process of self-directed learning, the focus of which is a student-driven project through which they engage critically with real world issues, e.g. peace and social justice, the environment and sustainability, or social entrepreneurship. To support their practical engagement, students are paired with mentors who are experts in their fields and give guidance, help develop research agendas, and provide continuous feedback throughout the project. In addition, students develop the theoretical grounding by following a rigorous and focused classroom program. The UWC Mahindra Project Based Diploma is a new and complete pre-university innovative curriculum, which we began offering to students last August 2015. Many educators talk about the need to shift from traditional curriculum and the existing structure of assessment but fail to do so because of the need for valid assessment models. With our model of project based learning combined with a formal diploma structure we aim to maintain our credibility with top universities around the world whilst allowing our students to learn though effective experiential engagement. The target audience for this session is aimed at educational leaders, who prepare students for life.

Workshop 2
Title: Experiential Education as an essential element of high school learning
Description: Experience is an effective method to create change in students and the world they touch. UWC Mahindra College is moving to a world that recognizes experiential education as more than merely complementary. However, assessment requirements, rigid mindsets and the desire to stay with what is familiar and safe remain barriers to real innovation. We are delivering a rigorous and recognized educational model that sees experiential learning completely integrated into the academic program. The presentation will explore three areas of our curriculum development. Engaging with our Human reality We have already started by changing our co-curricular program – Triveni – to a project-based model. In this program students can engage in need-based projects in different areas such as, sustainability, communication, peace, social justice, and education. Our objective is to shift learning from content delivery to experience in which knowledge and skill are acquired through engagement with real-life situations. Engaging with our Natural reality Learning is best when it is fun and contextualised. In this spirit UWC Mahindra College encourages learning to take place in the outdoors. The presentation will explore ways and means of developing a meaningful curriculum through engaging with outdoor adventure, exploration, and the environment. Engaging with our Intellectual reality UWC Mahindra Project Based Diploma is a high school program designed around independent, student-driven, professionally guided, multi-disciplinary, projects. This process is focused around a rigorous academic program, through which students will develop the skills and competencies needed to excel in the 21st century. The target audience for this session is aimed at educational leaders, who prepare students for life.

Workshop 3
Title: Preparing our students for what comes next
Description: The world in which our students will live tomorrow is radically different from the one in which we as educators grew up. Students and the ways in which that learn have also changed. Recognizing that students have changed and the world has changed requires us to think about how we teach and think about how we can continue to connect with learners. High school, and especially grades 11 & 12 are more important than ever because our students must be ready to meet an ever more challenging world that requires more from adults and requires it earlier. We know that the demands of tomorrow will more complex than the challenges, which we provide within our current academic structure. Today, around the world, students with the best education are being accepted into colleges and at work, yet are underperforming. Two options come up – either colleges/work are not asking for what they want or students are not being prepared for colleges/work. Neither of these options should be possible if we have good students receiving a good education. Maybe we need to revisit our concepts of i) a good student, and ii) a good education. The target audience for this session is aimed at educational leaders, who prepare students for life.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Mike Rodman

Biography: Mr. Rodman has extensive experience in all areas of risk management. In 1969,he became the first consultant employed by Albert Risk Management Consultants. A graduate of the University of Massachusetts - Amherst with a B.B.A. degree in General Business and Finance, he has completed numerous insurance courses and received the Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter designation in 1968. Mr. Rodman has served as a Board Member, Membership Chairman and Meetings Chairman of the Society of Risk Management Consultants, an international organization dedicated to the maintenance of high ethical standards, professional competence, independence and objectivity of its members. He has been qualified in the courts as an industry expert in more than one-hundred insurance litigation cases, has authored many articles and is a frequent speaker on insurance and risk management subjects. Mr. Rodman's clients include international schools, technology companies, manufacturers, and real estate firms.

Mr. King is a key member of the firm's Education and Financial Services Practice Groups. He joined Albert Risk Management Consultants in 2010 following seven years of insurance industry experience, having held a variety of insurance brokerage roles including positions in marketing and account management. Mr. King consults extensively on Enterprise Risk Management for educational institutions and corporate clients in a variety of industries. Mr. King is a graduate of Providence College with a Bachelor of Science degree in Finance. He has earned the Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter (CPCU) and Associate in Risk Management (ARM) designations in 2008, and has recently completed his Masters in Business Administration from Bryant University.

Workshop 1
Co-Presenter/s: Tim King
Title: What Keeps You Up At Night: Viewing Risks From All Angles (SCHEDULE THIS ON FRIDAY MORNING)
Description: In this session, we will look at specific challenges international schools face protecting their reputation, managing business continuity and understanding how the Board is protected, among other critical risk management topics. Built on examples from around the globe, practical advice will be offered that anyone can take back to the school and implement regardless of current risk management practices.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Jennifer Sparrow

Biography: Jennifer Sparrow serves as the deputy superintendent of Singapore American School (SAS). She started her career as a middle school humanities teacher at SAS. After ten years, she moved to Hong Kong International School (HKIS), where she spent three years as a teacher and five years as an administrator. In July 2009, she returned to SAS to serve as director of assessment and educational data and then the executive director of teaching and learning before moving into her current role. In addition to her work at SAS, Jennifer has facilitated over ten EARCOS regional workshops and dozens of EARCOS leadership conference sessions on the topics of quality assessment, use of data, and change leadership. She is currently a doctoral candidate at University of Southern California in organizational change and leadership. Jennifer is also an Associate Presenter in the areas of assessment and professional learning communities for Solution Tree.



Workshop 1
Title: Ensuring High Quality Teams
Description: One hallmark of many high-performing schools is the success its teachers have had in creating what is known as a professional learning community. Unfortunately, the skills that are needed to work together to analyze and improve classroom practice are not always present, resulting in teams that co-blab-orate instead of collaborate. This workshop will focus on strategies, tools, and structures that have helped Singapore American School ensure high-quality professional learning communities exist at all levels of the organization.

Workshop 2
Title: Strengths-Based Leadership
Description: There are three things effective leaders do: invest in the strengths of themselves and their employees, surround themselves with the right people and then maximize their team, and understand their followers’ needs (Rath & Conchie). This workshop will outline how one school has used StrengthsFinder 2.0 and the concepts of StrengthsBased leadership to positively transform its culture. Practical strategies will be shared for how this tool can be used with administrators, board members, faculty, staff, and students.

Workshop 3
Title: Be a Leading School, Not a Lucky School
Description: Examining data about student learning AND professional practice data ensures a school is leading, not lucky. This can only be effective if teachers feel safe and know how to engage with the data. This workshop will overview the concept of lucky versus leading schools, share teacher-friendly protocols that match specific types of data, and provide strategies for helping teachers feel safe while engaging in analysis of results.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Deb Welch

Biography: Deborah Welch is the CEO of the Academy for International School Heads (AISH). She was the Director of the American School of Doha and the Deputy Director for Learning at International School Bangkok. She was also Director of Teacher Training Center (TTC) and a course developer, trainer and consultant for Principals’ Training Center (PTC). Deb has been a teacher, curriculum director, staff developer, university instructor and educational consultant. She holds a Ph.D. in human and organizational development and a master’s in educational leadership and curriculum. She has a teaching certificate, administrative and superintendent endorsement from Colorado.



Workshop 1
Title: Maximize Your Impact as the Lead Learners
Description: How can the HOS and other leadership in the school best shape the conditions for continuously improving learning? In what ways might a school’s mission, vision and learning principles facilitate this? What structures such as space, pacing, curriculum, collaborative teaming and decision-making might be put in place to best support student learning? This session will offer strategies that have the impact of truly impacting learning.

Workshop 2
Title: Standards for a Head of School? Applying What We Know about Growth to the Lead Learner of a School co-presented with Chip Barder, Head of United Nations International School in Hanoi
Description: For many Heads of School and their Boards or owners, the appraisal process is an unsatisfactory one. Performance evaluation is typically based on a job description and goals for the year but usually little of what we know about learning and growth is incorporated into the model. How can the need for accountability be balanced with the need for growth, improvement and motivation when evaluating a Head of School and motivating him/her to improve? This session will focus on the creation of a systematic process to differentiate supervision based on standards, moving the process to a focus on self-assessment, goal setting and development of skills. This session is most appropriate for Heads of School, Board members, Deputy Heads, and those interested in the growth of school leaders.

Workshop 3
Title: Might a Headship be in Your Future? 7 Vital Skills that Aspiring and New Heads Need to Know
Description: If you have considered a position as head of an international school, are new in a headship, or are curious to know more about the position, then this workshop is for you. This highly interactive session will provide you with practical information for preparing and seeking a headship as well as a comprehensive picture of the position. How is the head of school different from the principalship and other leadership positions? What missteps would you want to avoid? Experienced heads of school know there are seven vital skills that you need to know in order to be successful. Come to figure out if the headship is for you and leave knowing that you have advice from those who know what it takes.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Andy Whitney

Biography: Andy Whitney is an American who has lived and taught overseas since 1981. Andy has a B.S. in Child Development from the University of Maine and a Master’s Degree in Education from Harvard University. Currently he is the Head of School at ECLC International Kindergarten in Seoul, South Korea where he has been since 2009. ECLC is an early childhood school of 100 students coming from 21 different countries. Prior to his move to Seoul Andy served as Program Coordinator and Early Childhood teacher at the Jakarta International School in Jakarta, Indonesia for over 20 years. Andy has also taught in Peru and Algeria. He is married and has one daughter who attends Middlebury College in Vermont, USA.



Workshop 1
Title: Ten Points That Early Childhood Educators Want School Leaders to Understand
Description: It is rare that top level school administrative leaders come from the early childhood sector. Because of this, early childhood programs may not always be given the attention that they need or deserve in a larger school environment. Speaking on behalf of early childhood educators, there are a number of points that we would like to make sure that school administrators clearly understand about our program and what we do.

Workshop 2
Title: Elements of a Quality Early Childhood Program
Description: A quality early childhood learning environment includes much more than simply painting, block play and nap time. A quality program offers a balanced, holistic approach which includes learning opportunities not just in the cognitive developmental area but also aimed at children’s physical growth and, perhaps more importantly at this age, their social and emotional growth. Research clearly indicates that competence in social and emotional skills are much better predictors of future school success than simply using academic achievement as a metric. This presentation will provide attendees with an overview of those elements which should be a part of every early childhood program. How does your school compare?

Workshop 3
Title: Allowing Children to Grow and Develop Naturally – A response to parents who want more and more (and more) for their young child
Description: We all want what is best for our children. We want them to have many opportunities to participate in a wide variety of activities in academics, sports, art and music. However, some parents clearly feel that schools are not doing enough in these areas. They lobby for either a more rigorous curriculum or they enroll their children in enrichment programs outside of school. There is a very active “industry” which caters to these parents. This industry’s subtle insinuation to parents is that children not taking advantage of these opportunities will somehow be “behind” their peers who do participate. An abundance of activities, organizations, tutors, events and materials are now available to families, often at a significant financial cost, to supplement their child’s education. Most early childhood and early elementary teachers would agree that at the end of each day their young students have had enough school. After school time should be considered “down time” and primarily devoted to open-ended, child-initiated activities. Brain research indicates that there are disadvantages or even dangers of providing too much in the way of academics or other structured extra-curricular activities to our young children. But… where do we draw the line? How do we, as educators, respond to these parents? What can we say to convince parents of the dangers of pushing their children too hard and too fast? This presentation will explore the challenges that schools today face when trying to provide a robust but balanced program for their students while satisfying their parents’ requests at the same time. We will identify not only the concerns but also look at what the school can recommend to parents to optimize their child’s development and ensure school success – all without adding undue stress and anxiety to their young lives.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Kendall Zoller

Biography: Kendall Zoller, EdD, is an author, speaker, and presenter specializing in communicative intelligence and Hacking Leadership. He is co-author of The Choreography of Presenting: The 7 Essential Abilities of Effective Presenters (Corwin Press, 2010) and president of Sierra Training Associates. He provides professional learning seminars and keynotes on Communicative Intelligence, facilitation and presentation skills, and adaptive leadership to schools, districts, universities, state agencies, law enforcement and corporations throughout North America and Asia. He also designed the Adaptive Leadership Institute for university department heads at CSU Sacramento. His international research focuses on identifying nonverbal patterns in the learning environment and their influences on thinking, memory, and learning. In 2015 he introduced Communicative Intelligence to explain the cognitive, neurological, physiological, behavioral, and social foundations of nonverbal communication.



Workshop 1
Title: Presenting with Intelligence
Description: Imagine being able to speak with credibility on demand. Imagine what it would be like for you if you could, with purpose and intention, reframe resistance during a meeting or presentation while simultaneously improving rapport and group dynamics. What if you could communicate at the same level of skill and expertise as you perform within your professional technical expertise? Imagine the possibilities. This course provides the skills and knowledge of communicative intelligence so that you can reach higher levels of communicative excellence. In this session you will learn the verbal and nonverbal patterns of credibility, approachability, rapport, how to read group dynamics, as well as how to recover with grace when things don’t go as planned. This hands-on course is designed and taught by Kendall Zoller, global trainer, author and originator of communicative intelligence.

Workshop 2
Title: Presenting with Intelligence (REPEAT)
Description: Imagine being able to speak with credibility on demand. Imagine what it would be like for you if you could, with purpose and intention, reframe resistance during a meeting or presentation while simultaneously improving rapport and group dynamics. What if you could communicate at the same level of skill and expertise as you perform within your professional technical expertise? Imagine the possibilities. This course provides the skills and knowledge of communicative intelligence so that you can reach higher levels of communicative excellence. In this session you will learn the verbal and nonverbal patterns of credibility, approachability, rapport, how to read group dynamics, as well as how to recover with grace when things don’t go as planned. This hands-on course is designed and taught by Kendall Zoller, global trainer, author and originator of communicative intelligence.

Workshop 3
Title: Acknowledging Resistance using Communicative Intelligence.
Description: Imagine being able to speak with credibility on demand. Imagine what it would be like for you if you could, with purpose and intention, reframe resistance during a meeting or presentation while simultaneously improving rapport and group dynamics. What if you could communicate at the same level of skill and expertise as you perform within your professional technical expertise? Imagine the possibilities. This course provides the skills and knowledge of communicative intelligence so that you can reach higher levels of communicative excellence. In this session you will learn the verbal and nonverbal patterns of credibility, approachability, rapport, how to read group dynamics, as well as how to recover with grace when things don’t go as planned. This hands-on course is designed and taught by Kendall Zoller, global trainer, author and originator of communicative intelligence.

^ back to top
------------------------