Workshop Presenters

Presenters Topic/Title
Michael Boll Media Technology
Sheena Cameron Literacy / Reading
James Delisle Literacy/reading
Chip Donohue Technology
Ann Helmus Literacy / Reading, Special Needs (SENIA), Counselors, ESL
Sandra Janusch ESL
Norman Kunc and Emma Van der Klift TBA
Hamorn Lau Literacy / Reading
Alexander Lyvers and Kelsey Long Project-Based Learning, Interdisciplinary Projects
Dianne McKenzie Evidence Based Practice
José Medina English as a Second Language/English as an Additional Language
Kristen Pelletier Leveraging Norms and Individuality
Ochan Powell Student Metacognition
Lori Langer de Ramirez Modern Languages and ESL
Pernille Ripp
Stephen Shore Sensory Processing Dysfunction
Bonnie Singer Literacy / Reading, Special Needs (SENIA), Counselors, ESL
Logan Smalley Media Technology
Steve Swinburne
Katie Day and Stacey Taylor
Kathy Walker Early Childhood
Fiona Zinn Play and Creativity/ Early Years

Michael Boll

Biography: Michael Boll is a husband, father to two children (one with special needs) and part-time technology coach for International School Bangkok. He is a partner in the 21st Century Learning Group where he works to support its mission of "Building Communities of Learners" through educational events in the Asia region. "Hear" more from Michael at 21clradio.com as he interviews educators making waves in our world.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Coding Stories in the Elementary School Classroom
Coding is a fantastic form of human expression. Like no other format, coding empowers students to bring characters, scenery and ideas to life. Participants will enjoy a hands on experience appropriate for all ES grade levels from Kindergarten-1st grade (Beebots) 2-3 (Scratch Jr) to 4-6 (Scratch Sr).

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Communicating Stories with Video in the Elementary School
Our media rich world continues to explode and many of us, certainly our students, primarily consume information via visuals, audio and video. While we teach our students how to write, we focus little on visual communication. This hands on session focuses on telling stories visually with an emphasis on camera angles, sound, imagery and storyboarding.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Technology, Dopamine, Our Students and You.
We live in a technology infused world and the persistent interactivity it gives us. Technology companies understand this and leverage our biological triggers for their own, usually economic, gains. This workshop discusses student use of technology today, how biology (dopamine and cortisol) plays a role and what we should do about it.

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Sheena Cameron

Biography: Sheena Cameron is an experienced teacher who has taught in New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. She has taught at primary, middle school and tertiary levels. Sheena currently facilitates literacy workshops in New Zealand and internationally and is the author of a number of books including Teaching Reading Comprehension Strategies (2009), The Writing Book (with Louise Dempsey), (2013) and The Oral Language Book (with Louise Dempsey), (2016). She regularly teaches in classrooms to keep in touch with the real world of teaching.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: High impact reading comprehension strategies and how to teach them
This workshop takes current reading comprehension research and translates it into realistic classroom practice. It will focus on practical ideas to teach high impact strategies such as self-monitoring and inferring that support all readers, particularly new learners of English and struggling readers. A Wikispace of downloadable material is also available.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Practical ideas for vocabulary learning
A student's vocabulary knowledge affects their ability to communicate effectively in both written and spoken contexts and plays a crucial role in academic success across all curriculum areas. This workshop outlines a comprehensive vocabulary programme and presents practical ideas and strategies that can be adapted across many levels.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Generating and organizing ideas for writing
One of the most important aims of a writing programme is to encourage students to love writing. This practical workshop presents a range of ideas to engage and motivate students to write for many authentic purposes. Useful templates to plan and scaffold students' writing and student examples will be shared.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Improving the quality and quantity of student talk
This workshop presents ideas to support teachers to include more quality 'learning talk' in classrooms and to embed purposeful oral language opportunities across the curriculum. It presents research based-ideas, activities and practical support material to translate theory into classroom practice.

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James Delisle

Biography: Dr. Jim Delisle has taught gifted children for 39 years. Jim retired from Kent State University in 2008 after 25 years of service as a Distinguished Professor of Education. Frequently, Jim returned to his "classroom roots" volunteering as an elementary school teacher in 1991, 1997 and 2006. Too, Jim taught middle school students one day a week between 1998-2008 and currently teaches gifted 9th graders part-time at Scholars' Academy in Conway, South Carolina. The author of 275 articles and 20 books, Jim's work has been translated into multiple languages and featured in professional journals and in popular media, including The New York Times, People Magazine, and on Oprah! Jim's newest book, Doing poorly on purpose: Underachievement in the quest for dignity, will be published in 2018. A frequent presenter throughout the U.S., Jim has also addressed audiences in England, Greece, China, Oman, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia. New Zealand (and now, Thailand).

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Twelve writing lessons for creating reflective middle school wordsmiths
Workshop description: Many writing lessons follow a standard format that it neither interesting nor purposeful for advancing student learning. In this session, though, twelve student-tested lessons that enhance character, creativity and self-awareness will be offered. Some activities are brief and humorous, while others are extended and require student introspection.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Doing poorly on purpose: Underachievement and the quest for dignity
Most "remedies" for reversing academic underachievement in able adolescents are punitive and disrespectful; hence, they seldom work This session provides a new look at "underachievement" while offering a set of school-based suggestions that is based on respecting the students' dignity and intelligence while aiming towards their higher academic achievement.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Appreciating the intensities of gifted and twice-exceptional (2E) individuals
Above all other attributes, gifted and 2E individuals possess a common characteristic: intensity. These intensities may relate to academics (including perfectionism); emotions, where extreme highs/lows disallow moderation; or everyday life, involving personal relationships and social interactions. In this session, recognizing and dealing with these intensities will be reviewed.

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Chip Donohue

Biography: Chip Donohue, PhD, is Dean of Distance Learning and Continuing Education and Director, TEC Center at Erikson Institute in Chicago. He is a Senior Fellow/Advisor of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children's Media at Saint Vincent College, where he co-chaired the revision of the NAEYC & Fred Rogers Center Joint Position Statement on Technology and Interactive Media as Tools in Early Childhood Programs (2012). Chip is the editor of Technology and Digital Media in the Early Years: Tools for Teaching and Learning (2015) and Family Engagement in the Digital Age: Early Childhood Educators as Media Mentors (2017). In 2012 he received the Bammy Award and Educators Voice Award as Innovator of the Year from the Academy of Education Arts & Sciences. In 2015, he was honored as a children's media Emerging Pioneer at the KAPi (Kids At Play International) Awards.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Stepping into STEM: Technology Tools as Catalysts for Early Learning
Engage children's natural curiosity in the world around them and encourage their interest in science, engineering, technology and math. Help children learn with and about technology as tools for STEM learning. put the "T" in STEM to provide catalysts for early learning, relationships and whole child development.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Reimagining Screen Time for the Digital Age
Parents and educators have raised concerns about the first generation of children growing up digital. Promote digital age "wellness" for children, parents, families and educators by focusing on what matters most for appropriate technology use: relationships, joint-engagement; social emotional learning; media creation; family engagement; teacher preparation; and media mentors.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Connecting the Dots between Child Development, Early Learning and Technology
Identify four essential roles for connecting the dots for young children-Manager, Mediator, Mentor and Maker. Learn how these 4M roles help educators and parents find the appropriate balance between "all yech" and "no tech" for raising and educating healthy and happy young children in the digital age.

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Ann Helmus

Biography: Ann Helmus,PhD is a clinical neuropsychologist and Executive Director of NESCA (Neuropsychology and Education Services for Children and Adolescents), in its 20th year in Boston. For the past five years she has provided educations and consultations in Asia. Dr. Helmus specialises in providing comprehensive holistic evaluations of the children with learning developmental and emotional disorders as well as strength-based evaluations for children who are typically developing. She obtained her doctorate degree from Boston University School of Medicine and her undergraduate degree from Brown University.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Overcoming the Blank Stare : Supporting Students with Writing Anxiety
The first of this two-part, joint presentation by Dr. Bonnie Singer and Dr. Ann Helmus will explore the neuro-biological roots of anxiety. We will identify the brain systems that underlie anxiety and examine the different forms of anxiety in children, focusing on how it manifests in children’s behavior in school.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Using Passion to Fuel Learning in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Based on the work of the Affinity Project, will present the paradigm shift of viewing "Obsessions" and "Scripting" as a powerful learning tool, especially for "hard to reach" students.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Providing Feedback to Parents, Even When They Don't Want It
We will discuss the strategies for sharing feedback that is constructive in a way that parents can take it in.

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Sandra Janusch

Biography: Originally from California, Dr. Sandra Janusch received a BA from UCLA, an MED TESOL from Holy Names University, and a PhD in Education with a specialization in TESOL from the University of Calgary, Canada. Sandi has lived internationally for most of her professional career, teaching and coordinating ESL programs in Canada, China, France, Indonesia, the Netherlands, the U.S. and Vietnam. Sandi has extensive experience in training teachers of English as a additional/foreign language, managing EAL/EFL programs, and in teaching online and face-to-face courses in pedagogy and second language learning. Now the Assistant Vice Provost for International and Academic Programs at the University of Washington Continuum College, Sandi oversees a large department that includes continuing education professional certificate programs, professional and online degree programs, summer youth programs, UW in the High School, UW Summer Quarter, the Osher Institute of Lifelong Learning, and International & English Language Programs.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Visible Learning and ELLs - New Ways of Building Academic Language Proficiency
Contemporary theories of language acquisition have prompted a shift in ESL pedagogy and traditional teaching practices for ELLs. Drawing on Reggio Emilia, Project Zero, and Stanford's Understanding Language projects, this workshop will explore new approaches for making language and language learning visible for teachers and students, and present ideas for developing academic language and disciplinary literacy.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: The Future of Higher Education and What This Means for Your ELLs
The Future of Student Needs: 2025 and Beyond is a comprehensive report outlining current and future pressures on traditional higher education models. Focusing on emerging student and societal needs, this session will present the major findings of the report and provide participants opportunities to explore their important role in preparing their ELLs (and all students) for an evolving higher education ecosystem in the future.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: ELPA21 - English Language Proficiency Assessment for the 21st Century
Come learn about the work of Stanford University and other partners in developing the English Language Proficiency (ELP) standards recently implemented in Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, Ohio, Oregon, Washington, and West Virginia. ELPA21 is the corresponding assessment designed to align and support Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English language arts and mathematics, and the Next Generation Science Standards.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Effective Communication in your Classroom - a Dialogic Approach
Harnessing the power of talk in your classroom can engage your students, stimulate and extend their thinking, and advance their learning and understanding. Building on the work of Thomas Farrell, Jeff Zwiers and Robin Alexander, this session will offer ideas for maximizing communication skills of both students and teachers through a dialogic approach to teaching.

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Norman Kunc and Emma Van der Klift

Biography: Although Norman Kunc and Emma Van der Klift are well known speakers and advocates within the disability rights community, they prefer to think of themselves as modern day storytellers, continuing the long held tradition of using humour and narrative to initiate self-reflection and social change. Norman and Emma travel extensively throughout North America and abroad providing in-service and training in the areas of inclusive education, employment equity, conflict resolution, and other disability rights issues. Norman and Emma have a book, several journal articles, and four book chapters to their credit. They also have developed and operate "Conversations that Matter," an online values training platform consisting of more than 120 video segments of conversations with the leading voices in field of disability rights and inclusive education. Norman was born with cerebral palsy and initially attended a segregated school for children with physical disabilities; At the age 13, he was integrated into a regular school. From there, he went on to complete a Bachelor's degree in Humanities and a Master of Science degree in Family Therapy. Emma is Autistic and is active in the Neurodiversity movement. She initially worked with non-profit agencies that support individuals with intellectual disabilities. She has since completed a Master's degree in Conflict Analysis and Management from Royal Roads University and is certified both as a mediator and a negotiator through the Justice Institute in Vancouver. Norman and Emma are married and live in Vancouver, British Columbia.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: NEW STUDENTS; NEW QUESTIONS: Supporting the Classroom Teacher in an Inclusive School
As an increasing number of students with disabilities are being included into regular classes, there is growing consensus among teachers about what supports need to be in place for inclusion to be manageable and successful. Based on personal experience and the input of classroom teachers throughout North America, Norman Kunc and Emma Van der Klift examine five areas of support which need to be present if teachers are to welcome students with disabilities into their classrooms: Information, Collaborative Planning, Shared Agreement on Goals and Expectations, Classroom and School Based Supports, Classroom Assistants. This session also addresses the question of fair and appropriate evaluation and briefly describes some ideas for supporting students with atypical or disruptive behaviour.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: HELL-BENT ON HELPING: Friendship, Benevolence, and the Politics of Help
Many of us have created friendship circles and buddy systems in an attempt to help students with disabilities feel more included in their neighbourhood schools. In spite of genuine efforts and admirable intent, these supports have often perpetuated traditional attitudes of charity and benevolence. In this presentation, Norman Kunc and Emma Van der Klift examine the issues of friendship, help, respect, and benevolence. They suggest how teachers can support a student with a disability in their class without turning him/her into the "poster child" of the school.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: THE PERSON IS NOT THE PROBLEM; THE PROBLEM IS THE PROBLEM! Using Hostage Negotiation Strategies To Solve Classroom Management Problems
Hostage negotiators must quickly establish trust, build rapport, and foster collaboration in extreme crisis situations. The skills they use can be enormously helpful for administrators and teachers in creating a safe, collaborative classrooms and schools. In this presentation, Emma Van der Klift draws on her Master's research and outlines some of the skills that hostage negotiators use to-de-escalate crisis situations and suggests how teachers and administrators can use the skills so that they can be less reactive and more responsive when dealing with students and colleagues.

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Hamorn Lau

Biography: Hamorn has taught Grade One, Four and Five at American International School (Hong Kong). She holds a Bachelor of Teaching degree (The University of Melbourne), a Master of Education degree (The University of Hong Kong) and a Master of Counseling degree (Monash University). She is a Doctor of Education student (specializing in English Language Education) at The Education University of Hong Kong. The pilot study of her EdD research was selected to receive EARCOS Action Research Grant in 2016-17. Her research interests include language education, early childhood education, vocabulary acquisition, drama education and ESL/ELL. She is a presenter at various international conferences, such as International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) and 21st Century Learning Conference (21CLHK). She is the founder and president of Read2KidsHK (non-profit-making society), which aims to promote family literacy in the local communities in Hong Kong.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Learning Vocabulary through Drama Games
Participants will play drama games to acquire new word knowledge. Such active engagement will let participants experience the fun of learning vocabulary through drama games, such as hot-seating, construct a “What-if” world, and improvisation. Following each game is a group discussion about the underlying rationale and educational value.

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Alexander Lyvers and Kelsey Long

Biography: Zander is a Middle School Humanities teacher at the American International School in Hong Kong. He is passionate about project-based learning and student engagement. Zander gained experience collaborating with other educators on intensive projects at the Young Women’s Leadership School of Astoria, a project-based school in New York City. As a recipient of the EARCOS Action Research Grant, he conducted his research on the effects of interdisciplinary projects in building a collaborative culture for teachers and students.

Kelsey is a Middle School Visual Arts teacher at the American International School in Hong Kong. She teaches a choice-based visual art program with a focus on contemporary and interdisciplinary art. Kelsey gained experience teaching diverse student bodies with differing needs and skill sets within Title I schools in New Jersey. At AIS Hong Kong, Kelsey has worked with her colleagues to create project-based learning experiences that integrate visual art with humanities and science.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: The Effects of Intensive Projects on School Culture
How can intensive projects impact student and teacher attitudes on collaboration? This year at AIS Hong Kong, Middle School teacher teams designed 3 intensive projects throughout the school year. During each of these intensives, the normal school schedule was disrupted to accommodate an integrated project that culminated in a learning exhibition. This action research documented the strengths and weaknesses of the implementation of these intensives, and how these experiences impacted teacher and student attitudes towards project-based learning. We will facilitate breakout groups for teachers with experience with project-based learning to explore opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration. For those new to PBL, we will offer resources to begin planning a large scale project.

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Dianne McKenzie

Biography: Dianne McKenzie is a passionate educator and teacher librarian who strives to make professional learning meaningful and thought provoking. She was a teacher librarian for over 15 years in Hong Kong and is now a full time professional development provider for teachers and librarians globally. She is an experienced IB workshop leader and site visitor and has presented at a number of conferences and seminars worldwide. As moderator of the International School Library connection Facebook page and through her blog, Library grits, she mentors and learns from Educators worldwide. An avid scuba diver, cyclist and photographer, she attempts to connect these passions, however She has yet to overcome the challenges of cycling underwater while diving and taking photographs simultaneously.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Are You Making An Impact?
This workshop will explore evidence based practice and offer strategies for action based research to generate evidence to be a catalyst for change or, for continuation of practices.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Planning with Purpose
The workshop participants will identify what they value to create meaningful mission and vision statements applicable to their context, which they can be applied to create meaningful goals, policy and service.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Using Social Media in the Educational Setting
Participants will identify their purpose of using social media in their context, examining and generating policies and actions and determine ways to improve practice based on current research and applications.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Creating Meaning from Copyright Confusion
When can we use other people's work and what can we do with it? Using Intellectual Property can be confusing with fair use, creative commons, public domain and copyright all being bandied about -what do these mean to the educator and students when using other peoples work?

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José Medina

Biography: Dr. José Medina presently serves as the Associate Division Director for the Language and Culture Education Division at the Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) in Washington, DC. Dr. Medina guides a team of professionals that provide professional development, technical assistance, job-embedded, and program evaluation support to schools in the United States and internationally, including Asia and Latin America. Dr. Medina is also often a featured keynote speaker at national and school district conferences.

Bilingual in English and Spanish, José was the Director of Bilingual and ESL Education for a school district in Texas prior to coming to CAL. In that role, José provided professional development and implemented systems to ensure that all teachers were well equipped to effectively meet English learners' needs. In over twenty years of service in the field of education, Jose has worked as an educator and school administrator at the elementary, middle, and high school levels.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: As An ESL/EAL Educator, How Culturally Proficient Am I?
Via strategies that are interactive, this presentation will strengthen participants' ability to serve all English learners. The Cultural Proficiency Continuum, along with tools that can be implemented at the class and/or school levels will be shared, as a means to increase educator advocacy and promote enriched rather than remedial instruction.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Developing All Four Language Domains for Students Learning English
This presentation will highlight the Seven Principles of Effective Instruction for English Learners, with a focus on Principle #4 which specifically addresses the need for teachers to plan for and develop all four language domains (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in English learners.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Creating Comprehensible Input in the Classroom
Participants will have an opportunity to engage in activities that will strengthen their ability to create access for English learners via Comprehensible Input. This interactive session will include strategies that can be quickly applied in a classroom setting, to support students engaged in the dynamic process of learning additional languages.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Fun Ways to Increase Vocabulary Acquisition for English Learners!
This interactive session will provide participants with a variety of fun and research-based strategies that will increase vocabulary acquisition for English learners, in authentic contexts. Word work in isolation is not best practice, and thus, educators must be creative in establishing fun tasks that also increase students' vocabulary.

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Kristen Pelletier

Biography: Kristen worked at the International School of Brussels for 19 years, first as an intensive learning support teacher and for the last 11 years as the Director of Student Support Services developing a model inclusive school. She is a founding Director and Design Team Member of the Next Frontier Inclusion (NFI) a non-profit open source collaborative designed to share best practice and support schools to become authentically inclusive. She is a trainer for the Teacher Training Center, and Education Across Frontiers. Kristen is in her first year of full-time independent consultancy work with the goal of supporting international schools on their journey toward exemplary inclusive cultures and practices. She offers a range of professional development in collaborative teaching, classroom based interventions, services delivery, and conducts learning support audits and strategic planning. Redefining Access - Creating Opportunities for Inclusion to Thrive! kpelletier@redefiningaccess.org

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Starting From Different - Busting the Myth of Average!
Demystifying the myth of average and embracing individuality as the 'new norm' is where personalized learning thrives. So how does one manage individuality, agency, and personalization in educational systems that are designed around the norms of average? We will use a polarity map to understand the interdependence between norms and individuality.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Understanding Parents of Children Who Learn Differently
Understanding parents as they process the understanding of their child's learning differences is the critical to building partnerships to support their children, and to put them all on the path for success. What are parents going through and what are some strategies that work to get you authentically working together?

WORKSHOP 3
Title: What is that Behavior telling you?
Behaviors are an indicator of an unmet need that has a dramatic effect on learning. An understanding of potential causes or functions of behavior, and developing proactive responses allow us to consider how to shape behavior proactively. Figuring out what that behavior is telling you is the key to moving forward positively.

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Ochan Powell

Biography: Dr. Ochan Kusuma-Powell is the Director of Education Across Frontiers, an organization dedicated to the professional learning of international school educators. She also serves on the Design Team for The Next Frontier Inclusion - a non-profit organization devoted to supporting international schools in becoming more inclusive of students with special learning needs. Ochan has presented numerous workshops and courses in the areas of differentiation, assessment, teacher emotional intelligence, coaching and collaboration and is an Associate Trainer for Cognitive CoachingSM and Adaptive Schools. Together with her husband Bill, Ochan co-authored Count Me In! Developing Inclusive International Schools (2000), Making the Difference: Differentiation in International Schools (2008), Becoming an Emotionally Intelligent Teacher (2010), How to Teach Now: Five Keys to Personalized Learning in the Global Classroom (2012), The OIQ Factor: Raising the Organizational Intelligence of your school (2013) and Teacher Self-Supervision: Why teacher evaluation is a failed system and what we can do about it (2015).

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Learning to Learn: How Teachers Can Facilitate Student Metacognition
Schools claim to teach students to learn how to learn, yet few do so explicitly. Recent research suggests metacognition to be a powerful influence on student achievement and lifelong learning. In this interactive workshop, we will develop a common understanding of metacognition, its components, and how we might promote it in students.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Learning Support & EAL - An Essential Partnership
When learning support and EAL programs are set up in competition with each other, students lose. The question, "Is this a language or a learning issue?" Understanding the bidirectional influences of language on learning, we will explore an asset-based approach to interventions for students who need support in both areas.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Lifting The Status or Learning Support
When school programs such as learning support suffer from low status, they receive less leadership time and attention, have less access to resources, and figure poorly in a school's profile. What might be the impact on teachers who staff these programs, and what might be the effects on student learning? We will explore three possible status enhancers.

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Lori Langer de Ramirez

Biography: Dr. Lori Langer de Ramirez began her career as a teacher of Spanish, French and English as a Second Language. She holds a Master's Degree in TESOL and Applied Linguistics and a Doctorate in Curriculum and Teaching from Teachers College, Columbia University. She is currently the Director of World and Classical Languages & Global Language Initiatives at the Dalton School in New York City. Lori is a consultant and workshop presenter in public and independent schools in the United States and in international schools around the world. She is the author of several books, has contributed to many language textbooks and written numerous articles about second language pedagogy and methodology. Her website (www.miscositas.com) offers virtual picturebooks, videos, thematic units and other curricular materials for teaching world languages.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Social Justice and Languages: The Amazing Case of El Biblioburro
In this session, we will explore social justice-based thematic units and activities based on El Biblioburro, a Colombian teacher who brings books to rural children on his donkey. Through this unit, language students learn about geography, socioeconomic issues, and history while participating in class projects to improve the lives of others.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: A Sympathy Protest: Simulations and Role Play in the Language Classroom
Accompanied by real-world tasks and critical thinking activities, simulations can be engaging, effective, and fun! Students can take on the roles of characters in a historical event, a work of literature, or any story and, by taking on new identities, they can delve more deeply into diverse cultural perspectives. Participants in this session will explore a variety of role plays and simulations for their own classes.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Piecing together the proficiency puzzle
It can be challenging to determine how well our students are doing in our language classes. What kind of feedback is most effective for language learners? In this session we will explore backward design, the use of rubrics, standards-based and performance assessments, Can-Do statements and portfolios. Resources and assessment examples will be provided.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Windows and Mirrors - Exploring and celebrating best practices in language teaching
Through images of classroom practice, we will explore research- and standards-based best practice in language teaching. The practices will provide us with mirrors to see how our existing teaching reflects best practice and windows through which to see new methods and strategies for improving the language learning experience for all learners. Specific activities and lesson ideas will be shared.

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Pernille Ripp

Biography: Pernille Ripp is an expert in literacy and technology integration and dedicates her research and practice to developing engaged and empowered students and communities. She is a teacher, speaker, author, blogger, and passionate advocate for education. In 2010, Pernille founded The Global Read Aloud, a global literacy initiative that began with a simple goal in mind: one book to connect the world. From its humble beginnings, the GRA has grown to connect more than 2,000,000 students in 60 different countries. She is the author of Passionate Learners - How to Engage and Empower Your Students (Routledge), now in its second edition, Empowered Schools, Empowered Students (Corwin), Reimagining Literacy Through Global Collaboration (Solution Tree), and the forthcoming Passionate Readers (Routledge). Her work has also been featured by many print and online journals including Entersekt, Literacy Today, The New York Times, School Library Journal, The Guardian, and MiddleWeb. Pernille's current research interest is in creating passionate literacy environments within the restriction of our current educational systems to helping students fall in love with literacy again.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Passionate Readers - The Art of Reaching and Engaging Every Child
With 28% of adults reporting that they have not read a book in the last 12 months, we are facing a mounting reading crisis. So what can we, as the educators who teach this future generation of readers, do to create more engaging reading experiences? Focusing on teacher reading identity, classroom environment and library, as well as student reading identity, this is a keynote sure to inspire. From re-thinking major literacy decisions, to all of the small decisions we make daily; this is meant to be a practical keynote that will offer up ideas to be implemented the very next day.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Passionate Writers
We all seem to discuss the need for global collaboration and get excited when others do it, but how do we bring this into our own environments? Global collaboration isn't meant to make more work for you, but instead meant to engage students and staff in a more authentic manner in already pre-existing learning. Come to this workshop and find ways to fit global learning and global connections into what you are already doing, without the need to be 1to1 or have crazy amounts of technology.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Reimagining Literacy Through Global Collaboration Teaching
We all seem to discuss the need for global collaboration and get excited when others do it, but how do we bring this into our own environments? Global collaboration isn't meant to make more work for you, but instead meant to engage students and staff in a more authentic manner in already pre-existing learning. Come to this workshop and find ways to fit global learning and global connections into what you are already doing, without the need to be 1 to 1 or have crazy amounts of technology.

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Stephen Shore

Biography: Diagnosed with "Atypical Development and strong autistic tendencies" and "too sick" for outpatient treatment Dr. Shore was recommended for institutionalization. Nonverbal until four, and with much support from his parents, teachers, wife, and others, Stephen is now a professor at Adelphi University where his research focuses on matching best practice to the needs of people with autism. In addition to working with children and talking about life on the autism spectrum, Stephen is internationally renowned for presentations, consultations and writings on lifespan issues pertinent to education, relationships, employment, advocacy, and disclosure. His most recent book College for Students with Disabilities combines personal stories and research for promoting success in higher education. A current board member of Autism Speaks, president emeritus of the Asperger's Association of New England, and advisory board member of the Autism Society, Dr. Shore serves on the boards of several autism related organizations.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Senses and Sensibilities: An Inside View on Sensory Issues —> Solutions
Variations in sensory processing for persons with autism and other disabilities often cause great discomfort and unreliable perception. This presentation will enable susceptible individuals and those supporting them to minimize sensory overload through easy to implement solutions, thereby enabling those with sensory issues to lead fulfilling and productive lives. Participants shall… 1. experience what sensory overload may feel like for a susceptible individual, 2. list at least three situations that might indicate that a sensory issue is present, 3. learn how to develop and implement accommodations for sensory issues, and, 4. become familiar with instruments for assessing for sensory issues.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: 3 A’s of Autism: Awareness, Acceptance & Appreciation to Promoting Fulfilling and Productive Lives
The 3 A’s of Autism. We are transitioning from “awareness” to “acceptance” and headed to “appreciation” as society begins to value individuals on the autism spectrum for whom they are. Examples of people, organizations, and entire countries at each stage of development will be presented. Participants shall be able to… 1. understand the context of awareness and acceptance as a pathway towards appreciation where people on the autism spectrum are valued for whom they are. 2. describe at least 2 examples where a perceived weakness can be considered a weakness as a strength for leading a fulfilling and productive life. 3. transition from thinking of autism in terms of deficit, disorder, and disability to an abilities based model of autism by asking what *can* the individual do.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Including Students with Autism and other Disabilities in the Music Curriculum —> Practical solutions
Presentation focuses on meaningful inclusion of children with autism and other disabilities in learning to play instruments, participate in ensembles, and in general music class using techniques applicable to all learners. Music as THE means of communication, organizing verbal communication skills, and addressing challenges in the motoric, social, representation, and other areas are explored. Participants shall… 1. learn practical solutions for including students with disabilities in music, 2. list at least two secondary benefits for engaging in music, 3. be exposed to an alternate way of teaching notation, 4. learn techniques for meaningful inclusion through alternate yet related activities

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Bonnie Singer

Biography: Bonnie Singer, Ph.D. is the founder and CEO of Architects For Learning, where she provides teacher professional development and school consultation internationally and directs a staff in the Boston area that provides academic intervention, assessment, and consultation services for K-12 and college-age students. With expertise in language, literacy, and learning, she is passionate about working with students who struggle academically. In partnership with Dr. Anthony Bashir, she developed EmPOWER™, a method for teaching expository writing, Brain Frames®, graphic scaffolds for language, literacy, teaching, and learning, as well as several assessment tools for writing. Her primary research and numerous publications focus on the relationship between spoken and written language, cognition, executive functions, spatial processing, and self-regulated learning. Dr. Singer currently holds an adjunct teaching position in graduate and professional studies at Endicott College. Formerly, she was an instructor in the Communication Sciences and Disorders department at Emerson College.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Overcoming the blank stare: Supporting students with writing anxiety (Part 1)
Presenters: Dr. Bonnie Singer and Dr. Ann Helmus
The first of this two-part, joint presentation by Dr. Bonnie Singer and Dr. Ann Helmus will explore the neuro-biological roots of anxiety. We will identify the brain systems that underlie anxiety and examine the different forms of anxiety in children, focusing on how it manifests in children's behavior in school.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Overcoming the blank stare: Supporting students with writing anxiety (Part 2)
Presenters: Dr. Bonnie Singer and Dr. Ann Helmus
The second half of this two-part, joint presentation by Dr. Bonnie Singer and Dr. Ann Helmus will offer practical recommendations for teachers and specialists working with children whose academic performance is hindered by writing anxiety.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: The influence of ADHD on reading comprehension
This session will explore the ways in which attention and related executive function and working memory systems play a role in reading comprehension. We will examine how attention mechanisms support and constrain text comprehension and offer a number of practical, research-based instructional strategies for students with ADHD and reading comprehension vulnerabilities.

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Logan Smalley

Biography: Logan Smalley is the founding director of TED's youth and education initiative, TED-Ed;an award-winning website, content format and program offering that serves millions of teachers and students every day. Prior to working for TED, Logan was selected as a TED Fellow for his roles as director, editor and composer of the nonprofit, feature-length film, Darius Goes West (28 film festival awards, 2007). Logan is also the founder of CallMeIshmael.com; a creative, participatory literary initiative that was an honoree for the National Book Foundation's Innovations In Reading Prize in 2015. Logan began his career as a high school special education teacher in his hometown of Athens, GA, and he currently lives and works in New York City. He holds a B.Ed. in Special Education from the University of Georgia, and an Ed.M. in Technology Innovation and Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: How to Use TED-Ed In Your Classroom & School
TED-Ed’s youth and education initiative, TED-Ed, is currently being used to spark and celebrate the ideas of over 100 million teachers and students around the world. In this workshop, attendees will learn how they can incorporate TED-Ed’s award-winning website, content, and programs into their classrooms and schools.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: TED-Ed: What would happen if every educator gave a TED Talk
Join the founder of TED’s award-winning education initiative, TED-Ed, for a hands on workshop in which you will learn how to use TED’s new professional learning program — TED Training — to develop, package and share your ideas with the world.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: TED-Ed: What would happen if every educator gave a TED Talk
Join the founder of TED’s award-winning education initiative, TED-Ed, for a hands on workshop in which you will learn how to use TED’s new professional learning program — TED Training — to develop, package and share your ideas with the world.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Darius Goes West: How one special education student changed the world
Before being brought on to found and launch TED’s education initiative, TED-Ed, Logan Smalley was recognized as a TED Fellow for his role as Director, editor and composer for the hit documentary, Darius Goes West. Winner of over 25- film-festival awards, Darius Goes West is a story that every special educator needs to know. This workshop will be both motivational and practical, and it you’ll get a behind-the-scenes look at story that changes the way people think about disability, accessibility and life every time it is shared.

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Steve Swinburne

Biography: Stephen Swinburne was born in England and moved to America when he was a boy. His family moved a lot, and he took refuge in writing in his journals and listening to music. Steve always wanted to be an adventurer or a naturalist or a marine biologist, and he graduated from Castleton State College with a degree in biology and English. He worked as a ranger in several of our national parks and now writes and takes photographs for children’s books. Steve visits schools all across the United States and around the world, presenting assemblies and conducting writing workshops. Steve loves to travel, read, sing and play his ukulele, garden and take pictures. He and his wife live in Vermont.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: The A,B,C’s of Writing Workshops: A Children’s Book Author Shows How To Plan, Organize and Execute a Writing Workshop that Inspires Students and Grow Writers
Steve Swinburne shares practical advice on running a successful writing workshop and making the library a writing hub. Writing is an essential part of academic success. Many primary students lack motivation and confidence in their ability to write. Is there a way to increase student motivation, creativity and accuracy in the area of writing? How can you foster a non-threatening and fun atmosphere for young students to grow as writers? Away from their classrooms and surrounded by their favorite books, the library offers students a haven to relax and enjoy the process of writing. Through a brief power point presentation and anecdotal evidence, Steve will showcase how a writing workshop in the library can motivate and engage students to become more effective and creative writers.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Fiction or Nonfiction, Kids Want a Story!
An award-winning children's book author, Steve Swinburne, will inspire a passion for reading and writing engaging nonfiction stories for children. Kids LOVE narrative nonfiction writing that "READS LIKE A STORY". The days of Encyclopedia Brittanica regurgitation of facts are over. Thank goodness! Current great nonfiction writers employ the same literary devices as fiction writers, with a definitive advantage: every word is true. Like powerful fiction, nonfiction makes use of poetry, foreshadowing, irony, metaphor, a grabbing lead and a satisfying conclusion. Through a power-point presentation, humor and storytelling, veteran nonfiction author, Steve Swinburne, fresh from travels with sea turtles, wolves, manatees, and sloths, will take teachers, librarians and educators into the heart

WORKSHOP 3
Title: So You Want to Write a Kid’s Book? - The Nuts and Bolts of Writing for Children
Children's book author Steve Swinburne takes you from idea creation and blank page to printed book, covering (almost) everything you need to know about researching, writing and publishing a book for kids. In a humor-filled presentation Steve uses storytelling and over 30-year experience in children's writing to teach you about research, first drafts, rewriting, proposals, pitching an editor or agent, do you need illustrations or photographs, promotion, etc. Come to this workshop to learn the A-Z about the business of children’s books. Whether you're a beginner or intermediate writer or only have a dream of writing a children's book one day, Steve will offer practical and useful advice.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: The Power of Outside: Rethinking Writing in a Digital Age
Children's book author and naturalist, Steve Swinburne, makes a case for getting children outside in nature, away from screens and all the other distractions in their lives. Outside, with journal and pencil in hand, students engage the five senses, make startlingly fresh observations, and spark creativity through exploration of all that’s around them. Steve shows how "The Power of Outside" can ignite the child’s writing skills. We'll train ourselves to become observant. What do you see? What do you smell? Hear? Feel? We'll make a list. Add details. By introducing your students to writing in the outside, we foster active and curious minds. Minds hungry to grow as writers and readers!

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Katie Day and Stacey Taylor

Biography: Stacey has recently started as the Director of Library at Prem School in Chiang Mai, most recently she worked as the Director of Global Connections at Kambala in Sydney. She worked at a number of Australian Schools and Public libraries before that. In 2013 she won the John Hirst Award for excellence in the field of Teacher Librarianship. She is involved in the International Baccalaureate Library community and networks widely via social media channels.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: What factors make a school library great?
A panel of international school teacher-librarians from different countries in the region will share their thoughts on successful school libraries. Number of panelists: 5 x 10 minutes + 30 minutes discussion Q&A

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Kathy Walker

Biography: Kathy Walker OAM is the founding Director of Early Life Foundations and is one of Australia's leading parenting and education experts, public speakers and authors. In 2014 she was awarded an Order of Australia (OAM). She has received many additional awards and fellowships throughout her career. Kathy is a lead author with Penguin Publishing and the Australian Council of Educational Research with her texts for parents include: Ready Set Go - School Readiness and Preparation, Parenting, What's the Hurry, Future Proofing Your Children. Her texts for educators include: Early Childhood Play Matters, Play Matters and Engagement Matters. Kathy is regarded internationally as a leading curriculum, teaching and learning expert in personalised learning and play based learning. She is the designer of the first major personalised curriculum for schools in Australia (Walker Learning), which is implemented across Australia and internationally. Kathy is the Founding Director of Early Life Foundations, one of Australia's leading parenting and education consultancies in areas of research and consultation in education and parenting. Her expertise in these areas spans over 30 years.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Intentional Teaching in Early Childhood
This session provides examples of how to program with intention through play-based curriculum and also includes children's interests. As educators, we do not plan or set up children's interests for the sake of the children's interests. This session focuses on educating and intentional teaching. We remind educators they have expertise and a body of knowledge about children and how children learn through play. We don't start planning from children's interests - we plan with intention; from a starting point of expertise about early childhood development and then utilize children's unique contexts, culture and interests as a means to teaching and learning. This session provides examples of how to program with intention through play-based curriculum.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Developmentally and Culturally Appropriate Practice
This session provides a healthy overview of the mix between nature and nurture. The debate has been and gone. Through neuroscience, biology and genetics, we know for a fact that culture and environment alone are not the sole contributors to how a child learns and develops. This session provides a healthy overview of the mix between nature and nurture. It highlights the early signs educators need to be aware of for early intervention to ensure that any significant delay in speech, or other important and basic elements of development are not being missed. This session will cover a critical knowledge base that appears to be absent in many contemporary training and tertiary courses; temperament, brain research and basic elements of development are highlighted alongside the interplay of experience, exposure, culture and environment. Practical strategies underpinned by this knowledge are provided to assist educators in the daily decisions they make about children's needs and strengths.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Creating an Engaging and Intentional Learning Environment in Play Based Learning
A practical session on how to set up rich, engaging and intentional learning environments indoors This session focuses on how to set up an engaging environment that includes intentional provocations that link open-ended learning centers, to formal teaching throughout the day. It provides practical ideas for enriching and using the environment and resources to help scaffold and extend learning. Observations and unpacking our Demonstration Unit alongside photos and supporting documentation is part of this very practical session. Demonstrations of how to scaffold through the provocations are included. This session is for ECE and lower primary educators implementing play based learning.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Understanding children behaviour - strategies and support
This session supports educators in understanding why children behave in the way they do. It provides strategies to assist educators in helping and nurturing children to respond and move thorough the range of behaviours that can arise for babies to 6 years of age.

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Fiona Zinn

Biography: Fiona Zinn is an Educational Consultant based in Hobart, Australia. Drawing on 25 years experience in the early childhood, primary and tertiary sectors, Fiona consults widely with International Schools around the world to boldly re-imagine early years and primary pedagogy, curriculum and learning environments in response to research. Fiona currently lectures at the University of Melbourne Graduate School of Education, is elected to the Committee of the Reggio Emilia Australia Information Exchange and works with the International Baccalaureate as a Professional Development Educator, Field Representative, Global Curriculum Writer and Workshop Developer.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: The power of play. An essential condition for creative learning in the early years.
This workshop will explore the role, benefits and considerations PLAY as an approach to learning in the Early Years of School (3-6 year olds.) Unpacking the connections between play and creativity, participants will have the opportunity to see play as a strategy for learning, building relationships and constructing understandings.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: When you listen, what do you hear?
Connecting to the ideas of Reggio Emilia through a ‘pedagogy of listening’, this workshop will explore listening as a fundamental strategy for working with children in the early years (3-8 yrs). When we listen deeply to children, we tap into their incredible understandings and capabilities as they construct knowledge together.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Positive Learning Environments in the Early Years: Ideas for re-thinking learning spaces
The role of the environment can never be underestimated. When constructed thoughtfully, learning environments for young children have the power to nourish, support and promote deeper learning engagements. By learning to analyse a space, participants will explore lenses for an environmental review, which could transfer to their own learning environments.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Documenting Young Children’s Learning: The power of the mini-story
How do you document? Why do you document? How do we find the time? Borrowing from the ideas of Reggio Emilia, using the lens of mini-stories, this workshop will explore pedagogical documentation and set provocations for educators to re-consider small moments of learning; revealing the extraordinary in the ordinary.

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For more information

If you have any questions, please contact the EARCOS office or email Elaine Repatacodo, ETC Coordinator at lrepatacodo@earcos.org

Phone: +63 (02) 779-5147
Fax: +63 (49) 511-4694
Mobile: +63 928-5074876